Dragon's gate

Author Yep, Laurence,
Language English
Publisher
New York: Scholastic, 1995




Annotation:

Compact discs.



Subjects :

  • History
  • Juvenile fiction
  • Fiction
  • Chinese
  • Railroads

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Author Illustrator(s) :

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Best Books :

  • Adventuring with Books: A Booklist for PreK-Grade 6, 1997 National Council of Teachers of English
  • Children's Catalog, Eighteenth Edition, 2001 H.W. Wilson
  • Children's Catalog, Nineteenth Edition, 2006 H.W. Wilson
  • Eureka! California in Children's Literature, 2003 Book Wholesalers, Inc.
  • High Interest-Easy Reading, 1996 National Council of Teachers of English
  • Immigrant Experience, 1999 Bank Street College of Education
  • Kaleidoscope, A Multicultural Booklist for Grades K-8, Second Edition, 1997 National Council of Teachers of English
  • Middle And Junior High School Library Catalog, Eighth Edition, 2000 H.W. Wilson
  • Middle and Junior High School Library Catalog, Ninth Edition, 2005 H.W. Wilson
  • Notable Children's Books, 1994 Association for Library Service to Children
  • Recommended Literature: Kindergarten through Grade Twelve, 2002 California Department of Education
  • Sharing Cultures: Asian American Children's Authors, 2001 ALSC American Library Association

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Awards, Honors & Prizes :

  • California Book Awards, 1993 Winner United States
  • John and Patricia Beatty Award, 1994 Winner United States
  • John Newbery Medal, 1994 Honor Book United States

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State & Provincial Reading List :

  • Young Adult Reading Program, 1996; South Dakota
  • MRA Reader's Choice Award, 1997; Nominee Michigan

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Curriculum Tools :

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Reading Measurement Programs:


9780060229726, 0060229713, 0060229721
HarperCollins (New York NY:) 1993.

Accelerated Reader
Interest Level Upper Grade
Book Level 5.3
Accelerated Reader Points 10

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 6
Accelerated Reader Points 13


9780064404891, 0064404897
HarperCollins (New York:) 1995.

Accelerated Reader
Interest Level Upper Grade
Book Level 5.3
Accelerated Reader Points 10

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 6
Accelerated Reader Points 13


059020355X
Scholastic (New York:) 1995.

Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.

Lexile Measure 730
Accelerated Reader Points

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Reviews :

Julie Corsaro (Booklist, Jan. 1, 1994 (Vol. 90, No. 9))
This is an engaging survival-adventure story, a social history, a heroic quest. The story opens in rural China in 1865 as 14-year-old Otter, the privileged son of wealthy land owners, eagerly sails to California to join his father and legendary uncle on the transcontinental railroad. On a freezing, snow-filled mountain in the Sierras, Otter begins his harrowing journey toward self-knowledge as a member of a crew of outcasts headed by Uncle Foxfire, a dreamer who seems to have been defeated as much by western racism as by the fears of his Chinese companions. While the long tale brings together the many hardships known to have been suffered by Chinese laborers--cold and hunger, poverty and exhaustion, maimings and death--it is leavened by some humor. The language has an appealing naturalism, and the concerns (equality, identity, family loyalty, ethnic conflict) are universally human. While the cast is large, the characterization is balanced; Yep shows that even the Irish overseer who viciously whips Otter is an idealist. This dovetails nicely with Yep's The Serpent's Children and Mountain Light. A research note and scholarly bibliography are appended. Category: Older Readers. 1993, HarperCollins, $15 and $14.89. Gr. 6-9.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins (New York NY:), PUBLISHED: c1993.)

Kirkus (Kirkus Reviews, 1993)
Yep illuminates the Chinese immigrant experience here and abroad in a follow-up to The Serpent's Children (1984) and Mountain Light (1985). After accidentally killing one of the hated Manchu soldiers, Otter (14) flees Kwangtung for the "Golden Mountain"; he finds his adoptive father Squeaky and Uncle Foxfire in the Sierra Nevada, where thousands of "Guests" are laboriously carving a path for the railroad. Brutal cold, dangerous work, and a harsh overseer take their toll as Squeaky is blinded in a tunnel accident, Foxfire is lost in a storm, and other workers are frozen or half-starved. By the end, toughened in body and spirit, Otter resolves never to forget them or their sacrifices. Foxfire and Otter consider themselves only temporary residents here, preparing for the more important work of modernizing their own country while ridding it of Manchu, Europeans, and, especially, the scourge of opium. America is a dreamlike place; English dialogue is printed in italics as a tongue foreign to most of the characters; and though Otter befriends the overseer's troubled son, such social contact is discouraged on both sides. In a story enlivened with humor and heroism, Yep pays tribute to the immigrants who played such a vital role in our country's history. Explanatory note; reading list. 1993, HarperCollins, $15.00; PLB $14.89. © 1993 Kirkus Reviews/VNU eMedia, Inc. All rights reserved.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins (New York NY:), PUBLISHED: c1993.)

Betsy Hearne (The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, December 1993 (Vol. 47, No. 4))
An ambitious sequel to The Serpent's Children (BCCB 3/84) and Mountain Light (11/85), this tracks young Otter from his home in Kwangtung Province, China, to the Sierra Mountain range, where he joins his adoptive father and uncle to build a tunnel through solid rock for the transcontinental railroad. To establish a large cast, two diametrically diverse settings, and events from the years 1865 through 1867 is a tall order for one novel. Yep has succeeded in realizing the primary characters and the irrepressibly dramatic story of what amounted to slave labor for Chinese immigrants at the hands of ruthless bosses. In the process, however, secondary characters are flattened, the sense of time is foreshortened, the action piles up too fast, and explanation of motives sometimes replaces or repeats actual development. One key incident, for instance, involves a musician whose instrument is stolen, whereupon Otter inspires his crew of outcasts to chip in for another because "his music had become part of my life," something that will surprise readers who have only heard about this music once or twice before. The very same morning, the musician's fingers freeze and must be chopped off with a kitchen knife, an explosion blinds Otter's father, and Otter is publicly whipped for defying orders-all of this shortly followed by an avalanche. While such a sequence may very likely have occurred, it has the effect of crowding a work of fiction. Where the pace and focus are controlled, as in Otter and his uncle's scaling a peak to save their snowed-in camp, the writing becomes more credibly layered; and even when the story surfaces to a shallower level, the carefully researched details will move students to thought and discussion about a powerful piece of American history. Ad--Additional book of acceptable quality for collections needing more material in the area. (c) Copyright 1993, The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. 1993, HarperCollins, 275p, $14.89 and $15.00. Grades 6-10.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins (New York NY:), PUBLISHED: c1993.)

Robyn Gioia (Children's Literature)
What are the hardships of being a young Chinese boy in a new American frontier during the late 1800’s? What do you do when you have come from a privileged background and you are suddenly thrust into an unbearable work environment of little food, long grueling hours, and unbelievable danger? America’s quest to build a transcontinental railroad is historically detailed in this fictional account of laying track across an unforgiving mountain known as “Snow Tiger.” Young Otter wishes to join his father and uncle in America so he can be part of a new creation called the railroad. Forbidden by his adopted mother to join his father and uncle in the land of promise, Otter suddenly finds himself in jeopardy after encountering the combative Manchus. He arrives in America to find life is not what he thought. His uncle “Foxfire” is not the great man he thought him to be, and his once kingly father has been reduced to a groveling laborer. The intense physical labor, dangerous work, starvation, bitter cold, racial prejudice, and isolation bring the reader’s senses to life. We feel Otter’s desperation. Friendship and family love provide strength in this heart felt story. 2005 (orig. 1995), HarperCollins Children’s Books, $6.99. Ages 12 up.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1995 c1993.)

Gerrie Human (KLIATT Review, September 1995 (Vol. 29, No. 5))
This prequel to Dragonwings is an unusually powerful work of historical fiction set in 1867 when thousands of Chinese immigrants came to California to find a better life and ended up being forced to help build the transcontinental railroad. Fifteen-year-old Otter lives in Three Willows Village in Hwangtung Province, China, an impoverished land controlled by Manchu invaders. His father and uncle have been on several trips to California, the Land of the Golden Mountain, and they bring back glowing tales of the riches to be found there. But when Otter finally arrives, he is stunned to discover that not only has all the gold disappeared, but he and his countrymen are forced to help forge a tunnel through the Sierra Nevadas. Here he finds his father and uncle being treated as slaves with the rest of the immigrants, doing back-breaking, dangerous work. Otter cannot understand why his uncle, a brave, outspoken man, does not stand up to the cruel bosses, but sees that anyone who refuses to carry out an order is whipped. The working conditions are frightful; Yep estimates that 1200 Chinese died working on the railroad. Otter knows he must learn all he can about Western technology so he can bring that knowledge back to his people and drive out the Manchu invaders. Otter's heroic quest, his courage, the constant dangers he faces, are only some of the elements that make this a splendid story. Category: Fiction. KLIATT Codes: J*--Exceptional book, recommended for junior high school students. 1993, Harper Trophy, 272p. bibliog. 20cm. 92-43649., $3.95. Ages 12 to 15.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1995 c1993.)

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
This 1994 Newbery Honor Book, a prequel to Dragonwings, tells of 14-year-old Otter's 1865 emigration from China and subsequent travails in California. Ages 10-up. (May)
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1995 c1993.)

Donna B. Good (Audiofile, June 1995)
A young Chinese boy leaves his mother and joins his father in the land of promise, America. The harsh reality of building the transcontinental railroad sets a powerful scene for this novel. Although an award-winner, Dragon's Gate is not well suited for audio. Its long, harsh, cruel story line ends with a weak offering of hope, which will not satisfy the listener. Despite this, Guidall does his job excellently, as always. He so skillfully changes his voice to distinguish the characters that the listener might think several readers are at work. Since most of the characters are men and the vocal changes must be subtle, this is a good demonstration of Guidall's talent. D.D.G. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine Unabridged. 1994 (orig. 1993), Recorded Books, Five cassettes, 7.25 hrs, Book Pak, $40.00.
(PUBLISHER: Recorded Books #94357 (Prince Frederick MD:), PUBLISHED: 1994.)

Sue Rosenz-weig (KLIATT Review, July 1995 (Vol. 29, No. 4))
This novel is based on the experiences of Chinese immigrants who built the transcontinental railroad in the 1860s, at great cost. Many died or were badly injured from explosives, avalanches, and other misfortunes. Young Otter, a Chinese teenager, longs to join his father and uncle in America, but when he arrives he discovers that life in America is not the heaven on earth he anticipated. Narrator Guidall's reading is excellent as he describes Chinese culture and beliefs and Otter's experiences. This is a good candidate for classroom use where students are studying other cultures or U.S. history. Category: Fiction Audiobooks. KLIATT Codes: J*--Exceptional book, recommended for junior high school students. 1994, Recorded Books, 5 tapes, 7.25 hrs. #94357.; 22cm; vinyl library binder; plot notes., $40.00. Ages 12 to 15.
(PUBLISHER: Recorded Books #94357 (Prince Frederick MD:), PUBLISHED: 1994.)

Recorded Books (Recorded Books, LLC.)
Based on the experiences of the Chinese who built the transcontinental railroad at the time of the American Civil War, Dragon’s Gate is the powerful story of one boy’s struggle for survival against overwhelming odds. Young Otter always dreamed of going to America, so when an accident forces Otter to flee China, he is ready to join his father who is working on the railroads in California. Life in America, however, is not what Otter had expected. Slaving from dawn to dusk under brutal working conditions and despite bitter cold, it is a daily struggle just to survive. Can Otter muster the courage and strength he needs to stand against his foremen--is it even possible one young boy can make a difference? Newbery Award-winning author Laurence Yep writes convincingly about a chapter in history often ignored by a nation preoccupied with civil war. Blending elements of Otter’s Chinese heritage with his experiences in the Sierra Nevadas, Yep creates a moving story that will touch the heart. n.d., Recorded Books, Unabridged Cassette - Library Edition; 94357, $51.75. Ages 13 to 18.
(PUBLISHER: Recorded Books #94357 (Prince Frederick MD:), PUBLISHED: 1994.)

Recorded Books (Recorded Books, LLC.)
Based on the experiences of the Chinese who built the transcontinental railroad at the time of the American Civil War, Dragon’s Gate is the powerful story of one boy’s struggle for survival against overwhelming odds. Young Otter always dreamed of going to America, so when an accident forces Otter to flee China, he is ready to join his father who is working on the railroads in California. Life in America, however, is not what Otter had expected. Slaving from dawn to dusk under brutal working conditions and despite bitter cold, it is a daily struggle just to survive. Can Otter muster the courage and strength he needs to stand against his foremen--is it even possible one young boy can make a difference? Newbery Award-winning author Laurence Yep writes convincingly about a chapter in history often ignored by a nation preoccupied with civil war. Blending elements of Otter’s Chinese heritage with his experiences in the Sierra Nevadas, Yep creates a moving story that will touch the heart. n.d., Recorded Books, Unabridged CD - Library Edition; C1758, $77.75. Ages 13 to 18.
(PUBLISHER: Recorded Books (Prince Frederick Md.:), PUBLISHED: p1994.)

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Publication Details:

  Publisher ISBN Notes
New York: Scholastic, 1995

Media Type: Language Material
273 p. ;
([Fic])
059020355X
9780590203555
New York: HarperCollins, 1995

Media Type: Language Material
273 p. ;
PZ7.Y44 ([Fic])
0064404897
9780064404891
Prequel to Dragonwings.
Recorded Bks., 1994

Media Type: Nonmusical Sound Recording
6ct.
F
0021381860
9780021381869
Unabridged version; read by George Guildall.
Prince Frederick MD: Recorded Books #94357, 1994

Media Type: Nonmusical Sound Recording
5tc 7hrs 15min.
AV F
0788701320
9780788701320
1994 Newbery Honor book.
George Guidall: Narrator.
Sequel to Mountain light.
Unabridged.
Prince Frederick Md.: Recorded Books, 1994

Media Type: Nonmusical Sound Recording
7 sound discs (7 hr. 15 min.):
PZ7.Y44 (813.54)
1402523033
9781402523038
"With tracks every 3 minutes for easy book marking."-Container.
"Unabridged Fiction."-Container.
An unabridged recording of the book.
In container (17 cm.).
Sequel to Mountain light.
New York NY: HarperCollins, 1993

Media Type: Language Material
273 p. ;
PZ7.Y44 ([Fic])
0060229713
0060229721
9780060229719
9780060229726

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