Dinotopia: a land apart from time /

Author Gurney, James,
Language English
Publisher
Atlanta GA: Turner Publishing, 1998




Annotation:

After being shipwrecked and saved by dolphins, Professor Denison and his son, Will, find themselves on the island of Dinotopia where dinosaurs and humans live together peacefully.



Subjects :

  • Juvenile fiction
  • Fiction
  • Juvenile literature
  • Islands
  • Dinosaurs
  • Fantasy
  • Dinosaurs in art
  • Fantasy in art
  • Adventure and adventurers

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Author Illustrator(s) :

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Best Books :

  • Middle And Junior High School Library Catalog, Eighth Edition, 2000 H.W. Wilson
  • Middle and Junior High School Library Catalog, Ninth Edition, 2005 H.W. Wilson
  • Best of the Best Revisited (100 Best Books for Teens), 2001 American Library Association-YALSA
  • Booklist Book Review Stars, Oct. 1, 1992 American Library Association
  • YALSA Best Books for Young Adults, 1993 American Library Association

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Reading Measurement Programs:


9780060280031, 0060280034
HarperCollins (New York:) 1998.

Accelerated Reader
Interest Level Middle Grade
Book Level 6.9
Accelerated Reader Points 3


1878685236, 9780060530648, 0060530642
Turner Publishing (Atlanta GA:) 1998.

Accelerated Reader
Interest Level Middle Grade
Book Level 6.9
Accelerated Reader Points 3

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Reviews :

George Hunt (Books for Keeps No. 90, January 1995)
A huge, seductive banquet of a book. Purporting to be the journal of a nineteenth-century biologist shipwrecked with his son on a lost continent where dinosaurs and humans live in harmony, it encompasses narrative, scientific notes, music, diagrams and detailed anthropological description, all wreathed in utterly sumptuous illustrations. The paradise lost of Dinotopia has fascinated all the children to whom I've shown this testament, though the visionary quality of the illustrations has been a more effective lure than the fairly challenging text. Nevertheless, it's good to have in your classroom for the sheer hedonistic delight it offers young browsers. Category: Junior/Middle. . ...., Dorling Kindersley, £9.99 pbk. Ages 8 to 10.
(PUBLISHER: Dorling Kindersley (London:), PUBLISHED: 1994.)

Denia Hester (Booklist, Oct. 1, 1992 (Vol. 89, No. 3))
The year is 1862, and the world is ripe for exploration. Biologist Arthur Denison and his young son, Will, set sail from Boston on a sea voyage Professor Denison hopes will ease Will's pain after the recent death of his mother; but their small schooner is destroyed by a typhoon in uncharted waters. Reaching shore with the help of friendly dolphins, the Denisons find themselves on a strange island inhabited by dinosaurs and humans living together in a peaceful, cooperative society. So begins the story told through Professor Denison's detailed and enthusiastic journal. The two castaways have stumbled onto a kinder, gentler world where reptilian wisdom has a decidedly Zen flavor: "Breathe Deep. Seek Peace. Although we find every kind of dinosaur here, it is the humans who catch our attention--characters like Tok Timbu, a blue-eyed African descended from a Yoruba king, and Nallab the librarian, who looks like a wizard gone to seed. As father and son travel the terrain that is Dinotopia, Gurney's vision unfolds via spectacular paintings that illuminate the sweeping vistas of Waterfall City and Canyon City as well as the uncharacteristically sensitive faces of the dinosaur mentors. This is the kind of lap book that readers will pore over for hours, studying the intricate drawings of dinosaur hatcheries and ingenious gadgets of every kind. As satisfying a story as it is, we are still left wanting more, since a mystery remains about what Professor Denison discovered in the forbidden World Beneath. Category: Middle Readers. 1992, Turner, $29.95. Gr. 6-9, younger for reading aloud. Starred Review.
(PUBLISHER: Turner Publishing (Atlanta GA:), PUBLISHED: 1998,c1992.)

Kirkus (Kirkus Reviews, 1992)
A sweet, visually attractive utopian fantasy about an island where humans and dinosaurs--not to mention mammoths, flying reptiles, and exotic plants--live together in peace. Races and sexes are equal, long life is assured, and innovation is used to benefit the inhabitants, all thanks to the dinosaurs' benign influence, literary stepchild of Robinson Crusoe and Shangri-La, midwifed by the Waits (Disney and Kelly), this creative anachronism purports to be a long-lost diary chronicling the discoveries of biologist Arthur Denison and his son after an 1862 shipwreck. The book's heart is its illustrations, presenting Gurney's imaginary society in the loving detail of the National Geographic--or a child's extravagant inventions. Much is made in the attendant publicity of the scientific accuracy, meaning that (though they speak seven languages, invent writing, and use tools) the dinosaurs look right. The technology surrounding the gliders, submarines, and helium balloons is also a little fuzzy, but by the time they appear the reader will either be charmed or alienated. More wistful fancy than a new vision of a cure for humanity's ills, but some adults--and children--will love it dearly. 1992, Turner, $29.95. © 1992 Kirkus Reviews/VNU eMedia, Inc. All rights reserved.
(PUBLISHER: Turner Publishing (Atlanta GA:), PUBLISHED: 1998,c1992.)

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
Posing as a 19th-century scientist's travel sketchbook, this entertaining hybrid mates the visual appeal of the Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady with a Jules Verne-like tale of Dinotopia, a land where dinosaurs and humans coexist. The scientist and his son travel around it, and the son grows up and falls in love. This unimaginative narrative exists mainly as a framework for the copious illustrations, which show breathtakingly exotic but impossible sights, such as a canyon city of people and flying dinosaurs, as well as amusing sketches of domestic scenes. The result is an enjoyable pastiche, full of visual references to cultures from Oz to Thailand and flavored with a Robert Fulghum-inspired philosophy: ``Observe, listen, and learn. Do one thing at a time'' (from the Code of Dinotopia). Though too superficial for the serious fantasy reader, this volume is great fun to browse through, and should find its way on to many coffee tables. 400,000 first printing; BOMC featured alternate; QPB selection; author tour. (Oct.)
(PUBLISHER: Turner Publishing (Atlanta GA:), PUBLISHED: 1998,c1992.)

Denia Hester (Booklist, Oct. 1, 1992 (Vol. 89, No. 3))
The year is 1862, and the world is ripe for exploration. Biologist Arthur Denison and his young son, Will, set sail from Boston on a sea voyage Professor Denison hopes will ease Will's pain after the recent death of his mother; but their small schooner is destroyed by a typhoon in uncharted waters. Reaching shore with the help of friendly dolphins, the Denisons find themselves on a strange island inhabited by dinosaurs and humans living together in a peaceful, cooperative society. So begins the story told through Professor Denison's detailed and enthusiastic journal. The two castaways have stumbled onto a kinder, gentler world where reptilian wisdom has a decidedly Zen flavor: "Breathe Deep. Seek Peace. Although we find every kind of dinosaur here, it is the humans who catch our attention--characters like Tok Timbu, a blue-eyed African descended from a Yoruba king, and Nallab the librarian, who looks like a wizard gone to seed. As father and son travel the terrain that is Dinotopia, Gurney's vision unfolds via spectacular paintings that illuminate the sweeping vistas of Waterfall City and Canyon City as well as the uncharacteristically sensitive faces of the dinosaur mentors. This is the kind of lap book that readers will pore over for hours, studying the intricate drawings of dinosaur hatcheries and ingenious gadgets of every kind. As satisfying a story as it is, we are still left wanting more, since a mystery remains about what Professor Denison discovered in the forbidden World Beneath. Category: Middle Readers. 1992, Turner, $29.95. Gr. 6-9, younger for reading aloud. Starred Review.
(PUBLISHER: Turner Pub. (Atlanta:), PUBLISHED: c1992.)

Kirkus (Kirkus Reviews, 1992)
A sweet, visually attractive utopian fantasy about an island where humans and dinosaurs--not to mention mammoths, flying reptiles, and exotic plants--live together in peace. Races and sexes are equal, long life is assured, and innovation is used to benefit the inhabitants, all thanks to the dinosaurs' benign influence, literary stepchild of Robinson Crusoe and Shangri-La, midwifed by the Waits (Disney and Kelly), this creative anachronism purports to be a long-lost diary chronicling the discoveries of biologist Arthur Denison and his son after an 1862 shipwreck. The book's heart is its illustrations, presenting Gurney's imaginary society in the loving detail of the National Geographic--or a child's extravagant inventions. Much is made in the attendant publicity of the scientific accuracy, meaning that (though they speak seven languages, invent writing, and use tools) the dinosaurs look right. The technology surrounding the gliders, submarines, and helium balloons is also a little fuzzy, but by the time they appear the reader will either be charmed or alienated. More wistful fancy than a new vision of a cure for humanity's ills, but some adults--and children--will love it dearly. 1992, Turner, $29.95. © 1992 Kirkus Reviews/VNU eMedia, Inc. All rights reserved.
(PUBLISHER: Turner Pub. (Atlanta:), PUBLISHED: c1992.)

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
Posing as a 19th-century scientist's travel sketchbook, this entertaining hybrid mates the visual appeal of the Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady with a Jules Verne-like tale of Dinotopia, a land where dinosaurs and humans coexist. The scientist and his son travel around it, and the son grows up and falls in love. This unimaginative narrative exists mainly as a framework for the copious illustrations, which show breathtakingly exotic but impossible sights, such as a canyon city of people and flying dinosaurs, as well as amusing sketches of domestic scenes. The result is an enjoyable pastiche, full of visual references to cultures from Oz to Thailand and flavored with a Robert Fulghum-inspired philosophy: ``Observe, listen, and learn. Do one thing at a time'' (from the Code of Dinotopia). Though too superficial for the serious fantasy reader, this volume is great fun to browse through, and should find its way on to many coffee tables. 400,000 first printing; BOMC featured alternate; QPB selection; author tour. (Oct.)
(PUBLISHER: Turner Pub. (Atlanta:), PUBLISHED: c1992.)

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Publication Details:

  Publisher ISBN Notes
Atlanta GA: Turner Publishing, 1998

Media Type: Language Material
159 p.
(JF)
0060530642
1878685236
9780060530648
9781878685230
New York: HarperCollins, 1998

Media Type: Language Material
159 p.:
PZ7.G98158 ([Fic])
0060280034
9780060280031
London: Dorling Kindersley, 1994

Media Type: Language Material
159p.
(823.914)
0751370231
9780751370232
New York: Scholastic Inc., 1993

Media Type: Language Material
159 p.:
(F Gur)
0590471821
9780590471824
Turner/Andrews & McMeel, 1992

Media Type: Language Material
159p.
F
0844143758
9780844143750
London: Dorling Kindersley, 1992

Media Type: Language Material
159p.
(823.914)
0751370002
9780751370003
Atlanta: Turner Pub., 1992

Media Type: Language Material
159 p.:
PZ7.G98158 ([Fic])
1878685236
9781878685230
Sequel Dinotopia the world beneath.

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