The bad beginning

Author Snicket, Lemony.
Language English
Publisher
London: Egmont, 2010




Annotation:

4-6



Subjects :

  • Fiction
  • Fiction.
  • Humorous stories.
  • Brothers and sisters
  • Children's stories.
  • Juvenile fiction
  • Humorous fiction.
  • Baudelaire, Sunny (Fictitious character)
  • Humorous stories
  • Siblings
  • Baudelaire, Violet (Fictitious character)
  • Baudelaire, Klaus (Fictitious character)
  • Orphans

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Author Illustrator(s) :

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Best Books :

  • Best of Book Sense From the First Five Years, 1999-2004 Book Sense
  • Children's Book Sense 76 Picks, Spring/Summer 2001 Book Sense 76
  • Children's Catalog, Eighteenth Edition, 2001 H.W. Wilson
  • Children's Catalog, Nineteenth Edition, 2006 H.W. Wilson
  • Kirkus Book Review Stars, 1999
  • Not Just for Children Anymore!, 2000 Children's Book Council
  • Publishers Weekly Book Review Stars, September 1999 Cahners

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Awards, Honors & Prizes :

  • Audie Award, 2002 Finalist United States
  • Grammy Award, 2006 Nominee United States
  • American Booksellers Book Sense Book of the Year (ABBY) Award, 2001 Finalist United States
  • Colorado Children's Book Award, 2003 Winner Colorado
  • Cuffies: Children's Booksellers Choose Their Favorite (and not-so-favorite) Books of the Year, 2000 Winner United States
  • Nene Award, 2003 Winner Hawaii
  • Nevada Young Readers' Award, 2003 Winner Nevada
  • Kanga Award, 2003 Shortlist Australia
  • Kanga Award, 2005 Top 15 Book Australia
  • Kanga Award, 2005 Top 15 Book Australia

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State & Provincial Reading List :

  • Flicker Tale Children's Book Award, 2003; Nominee North Dakota
  • Texas Reading Club, 2003; Texas
  • Wisconsin Battle of the Books, 2013-2014; Wisconsin
  • Colorado Children's Book Award, 2003; Nominee Colorado
  • Garden State Children's Book Award, 2002; Nominee New Jersey
  • Golden Archer Award, 2003-2004; Nominee Wisconsin
  • Nevada Young Readers' Award, 2003; Nominee Nevada
  • Soaring Eagle Book Award, 2003-2004; Nominee Wyoming
  • West Australian Young Readers' Book Award (WAYRBA), 2002; Nominee Australia
  • Nene Award, 2003; Nominee Hawaii
  • Indian Paintbrush Book Award, 2002; Nominee Wyoming

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Reading Measurement Programs:


9780060283124, 9780064407663, 0060283122, 0064407667
HarperCollins Publishers (New York:) 1999.

Accelerated Reader
Interest Level Middle Grade
Book Level 6.4
Accelerated Reader Points 4

Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.

Lexile Measure 1010
Accelerated Reader Points

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 6
Accelerated Reader Points 7


9780064407663, 0064407667
HarperTrophy (New York:) 1999.

Accelerated Reader
Interest Level Middle Grade
Book Level 6.4
Accelerated Reader Points 4

Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.

Lexile Measure 1010
Accelerated Reader Points

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 6
Accelerated Reader Points 7


999999
HarperTrophy (New York:) 2007.

Accelerated Reader
Interest Level Middle Grade
Book Level 6.4
Accelerated Reader Points 4

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Reviews :

Aurelia Scott (Audiofile, December/January 2005)
Tension-producing orchestral music, scene-setting sound effects, and most of all, Tim Curry's chocolate-voiced narration captivate the listener in this multicast production of the Lemony Snicket that started it all. As most people know by now, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire's parents die in a tragic fire, leaving the three children alone and pitted against the dastardly Count Olaf and the idiotic Poe family. Yet, no matter how dreadful their situation, the children triumph with their wits and manners intact. The cast of seven at first sound self-consciously formal until one realizes that the acting is supposed to be as mannered as the clever writing. It's all good fun for listening children and their parents. A.C.S. (c) AudioFile 2004, Portland, Maine Audio Program. 2004, Harper Audio, Three CDs, $22.00. Ages 8 up.
(PUBLISHER: Harper Children's Audio (New York N.Y.:), PUBLISHED: p2004 [1999])

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
Tim Curry, whose appropriately unctuous and sometimes slimy delivery are a hallmark of the audiobook versions of Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events titles, is thankfully up to his old tricks. Curry returns on the 11th installment, The Grim Grotto, to play Snicket, Count Olaf and all the gang with welcome flair. The enhanced CD features word games, photos and artwork when played on a personal computer. Curry also returns as the linchpin on a new, multivoice recording of The Bad Beginning, the first book in the series, which ties in to the feature film release of Paramount/Nickelodeon/Dreamwork's Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events. .
(PUBLISHER: Harper Children's Audio (New York N.Y.:), PUBLISHED: p2004 [1999])

Nancy (BookHive (www.bookhive.org))
You may have read about orphans in the Boxcar Children series, The Secret Garden, or the Harry Potter books, but the adventures of the three Baudelaire children are unforgettable. Is it because the parents of Violet, Klaus, and Sunny died in a fire? Or is it because Count Olaf is after the family fortune? Or is it because Sunny is trapped in a birdcage? It’s true these events are unfortunate and even scary, but told with a cleverness that keeps this series delightful and fun. As the author warns the reader, “ A Series of Unfortunate Events” is not for everyone...especially if you prefer something happy. Category: Adventure; Humor; Read Aloud; Scary. Grade Level: Intermediate (4th-6th grade). 1999, HarperCollins. Ages 9 to 12.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins Publishers (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Susan Dove Lempke (Booklist, December 1, 1999 (Vol. 96, No. 7))
This is a multi-book review. See also the title The Reptile Room. Alas, the poor Beaudelaire children! Violet, Klaus, and baby sister Sunny suffer all sorts of misfortunes, beginning when their parents die in a fire and they become wards of a distant cousin, evil Count Olaf. Author "Lemony Snicket" (a pseudonym, perhaps?) points out in an opening note, "It is my sad duty to write down these unpleasant tales, but there is nothing stopping you from putting this book down at once and reading something happy, if you prefer that sort of thing," and then proceeds to recount the story with relish aplenty. In The Reptile Room, it momentarily seems like the children might have a chance for happiness when they go to live with a kind reptile expert. Needless to say, Count Olaf makes certain their happiness doesn't last. The droll humor, reminiscent of Edwin Gorey's, will be lost on some children; others may not enjoy the old-fashioned storytelling style that frequently addresses the reader directly and includes many definitions of terms. But plenty of children will laugh at the over-the-top satire; hiss at the creepy, nefarious villains; and root for the intelligent, courageous, unfortunate Beaudelaire orphans. Category: Middle Readers. 1999, HarperCollins/Trophy, $8.95. Gr. 4-7.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins Publishers (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Kathleen Karr (Children's Literature)
The first offering of "A Series of Unfortunate Events" presents us with the very unfortunate, and very Dickensian Baudelaire children: Violet, Klaus, and baby Sunny. After learning that their wealthy parents have perished in a fire which also destroyed their home, the trio is shipped off to reside with Count Olaf. A very distant relative, Olaf has his own agenda: gaining the Baudelaire's fortune by forcing a marriage with fourteen-year-old Violet. How the orphans squelch Olaf's plans is the meat of this tongue-in-cheek spoof. 1999, HarperTrophy, $14.89 and $8.95. Ages 9 up.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins Publishers (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Kirkus (Kirkus Reviews, 1999)
The Baudelaire children--Violet, 14, Klans, 12, and baby Sunny--are exceedingly ill-fated; Snicket extracts both humor and horror from their situation, as he gleefully puts them through one terrible ordeal after another. After receiving the news that their parents died in a fire, the three hapless orphans are delivered into the care of Count Olaf, who "is either a third cousin four times removed, or a fourth cousin three times removed." The villainous Count Olaf is morally depraved and generally mean, and only takes in the downtrodden yet valiant children so that he can figure out a way to separate them from their considerable inheritance. The youngsters are able to escape his clutches at the end, but since this is the first installment in A Series of Unfortunate Events, there will be more ghastly doings. Written with old-fashioned flair, this fast-paced book is not for the squeamish: the Baudelaire children are truly sympathetic characters who encounter a multitude of distressing situations. Those who enjoy a little poison in their porridge will find it wicked good fun. B&w Illustrations, Not Seen. 1999, HarperCollins, $8.95. Starred Review. © 1999 Kirkus Reviews/VNU eMedia, Inc. All rights reserved.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins Publishers (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
If you are interested in stories with happy endings, you would be better off reading some other book. So cautions Snicket, the exceedingly well-mannered narrator of these two witty mock-gothic novels featuring the misadventures of 14-year-old Violet, 12-year-old Klaus and infant Sunny Baudelaire. From the first, things look unfortunate indeed for the trio: a fire destroys their home, killing their parents along with it; the executor of their parents' estate, the obtuse Mr. Poe (with a son, Edgar), ignores whatever the children have to say; and their new guardian, Count Olaf, is determined to get his hands on the Baudelaire fortune. But by using their individual gifts (Violet's for inventing, Klaus's for reading and researching and baby Sunny's for biting) the three enterprising children thwart the Count's plan--for now. The author uses formal, Latinate language and intrusive commentary to hilarious effect, even for readers unfamiliar with the literary conventions he parodies. The peril in which he places the Baudelaires may be frightening (Count Olaf actually follows through on his threats of violence on several occasions), but the author paints the satire with such broad strokes that most readers will view it from a safe distance. Luckily for fans, the woes of the Baudelaires are far from over; readers eager for more misfortune can turn to The Reptile Room, for an even more suspenseful tale. Exquisitely detailed drawings of Gothic gargoyles and mischievous eyes echo the contents of this elegantly designed hardcover. Age 9-up. (Sept.)
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins Publishers (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Janice M. Del Negro (The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, September 1999 (Vol. 53, No. 1))
These Aikenish takeoffs on unfortunate orphan novels promise a fast and funny series, and they very nearly deliver. In The Bad Beginning, the three Baudelaire children, Violet (age fourteen), Klaus (age twelve), and Sunny (a baby), are orphaned when the family manse burns down. They are given over to the care of Count Olaf, their wicked cousin. The count is a no-account villain, who proceeds to make their life a misery, conspiring to marry Violet in order to gain control of the family fortune. Violet foils the plot, the evil Olaf escapes, and the three children are taken in by the somewhat dense Mr. Poe, executor of their parents’ estate. The Reptile Room continues the saga of the siblings, opening with their being transported to the home of yet another distant cousin, herpetologist Dr. Montgomery, aka Uncle Monty. Uncle Monty is a jolly fellow, but unfortunately not for long--the evil Count Olaf shows up and makes short work of the orphans’ guardian. Olaf plans to kidnap them (and gain control of their fortune), and he nearly succeeds but is foiled (and escapes) once again. Snicket has a way of speaking directly to the reader (“I wish I could tell you that the Baudelaires’ first impressions of Count Olaf and his house were incorrect, as first impressions so often are. But these impressions--that Count Olaf was a horrible person and his house a depressing pigsty--were absolutely correct”) and of defining words in the context of dialogue that is, taken in large doses, irritatingly precious. The author does have the traditions of the genre down, however, and the lively misfortunes of the Baudelaires have a careening momentum that is well-served by the humorous if occasionally self-conscious text. The Baudelaire children have personality and tenacity, and their devotion to one another will hold readers when the mannered text does not. (Reviewed from galleys) Review Code: Ad -- Additional book of acceptable quality for collections needing more material in the area. (c) Copyright 1999, The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. 1999, HarperCollins, 192p, $14.89 and $8.95. Grades 4-8.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins Publishers (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Marsha Harper (The Lorgnette - Heart of Texas Reviews (Vol. 12, No. 3))
It's a bit hard to picture the kind of child who will enjoy this book. It will have to be a bright child: one who reads a lot, has a good imagination, and likes outlandish plots. It will also have to be one who enjoys the humor of didactic, often lengthy asides to the reader. The reader will likely either love Lemony or hate him. Here Snicket tells the story of the three wealthy Baudelaire orphans--Violet (14) the inventor, Klaus (12) the bookworm, and Sunny, an infant with very sharp teeth. After their parents' deaths, they are forced to live with Count Olaf, a distant cousin who is interested only in getting rid of them for their money. The three have to use their wits just to survive. This they do and also triumph over the vile Olaf. But is he really vanquished? Not at all; he and his detestable gang will no doubt show up in the second book. The author spins an exciting, suspenseful story with memorable characters, all in deadpan prose which adds to the fun--for the right reader. (Series of Unfortunate Events) Fiction. Grades 5-8. 1999, HarperCollins, 162p, $14.89. Ages 10 to 14.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins Publishers (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
Stand back, Snicket fans, the latest Unfortunate Events are about to unfold in The Slippery Slope by Lemony Snicket, illus. by Brett Helquist. Violet and Klaus Baudelaire must climb the titular terrain as they search for their sister Sunny in the Mortmain Mountains, after she is kidnapped by-who else-the diabolical Count Olaf. Will they reunite? Will they find their way out? Read on and find out.... Also being released this month, a slip-covered edition of the launch title, The Bad Beginning: Rare Edition, along with a stand-up portrait of the calamitous cast.
(PUBLISHER: HarperCollins Publishers (New York:), PUBLISHED: 2003 c1999.)

Susan Dove Lempke (Booklist, December 1, 1999 (Vol. 96, No. 7))
This is a multi-book review. See also the title The Reptile Room. Alas, the poor Beaudelaire children! Violet, Klaus, and baby sister Sunny suffer all sorts of misfortunes, beginning when their parents die in a fire and they become wards of a distant cousin, evil Count Olaf. Author "Lemony Snicket" (a pseudonym, perhaps?) points out in an opening note, "It is my sad duty to write down these unpleasant tales, but there is nothing stopping you from putting this book down at once and reading something happy, if you prefer that sort of thing," and then proceeds to recount the story with relish aplenty. In The Reptile Room, it momentarily seems like the children might have a chance for happiness when they go to live with a kind reptile expert. Needless to say, Count Olaf makes certain their happiness doesn't last. The droll humor, reminiscent of Edwin Gorey's, will be lost on some children; others may not enjoy the old-fashioned storytelling style that frequently addresses the reader directly and includes many definitions of terms. But plenty of children will laugh at the over-the-top satire; hiss at the creepy, nefarious villains; and root for the intelligent, courageous, unfortunate Beaudelaire orphans. Category: Middle Readers. 1999, HarperCollins/Trophy, $8.95. Gr. 4-7.
(PUBLISHER: HarperTrophy (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Kathleen Karr (Children's Literature)
The first offering of "A Series of Unfortunate Events" presents us with the very unfortunate, and very Dickensian Baudelaire children: Violet, Klaus, and baby Sunny. After learning that their wealthy parents have perished in a fire which also destroyed their home, the trio is shipped off to reside with Count Olaf. A very distant relative, Olaf has his own agenda: gaining the Baudelaire's fortune by forcing a marriage with fourteen-year-old Violet. How the orphans squelch Olaf's plans is the meat of this tongue-in-cheek spoof. 1999, HarperTrophy, $14.89 and $8.95. Ages 9 up.
(PUBLISHER: HarperTrophy (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Kirkus (Kirkus Reviews, 1999)
The Baudelaire children--Violet, 14, Klans, 12, and baby Sunny--are exceedingly ill-fated; Snicket extracts both humor and horror from their situation, as he gleefully puts them through one terrible ordeal after another. After receiving the news that their parents died in a fire, the three hapless orphans are delivered into the care of Count Olaf, who "is either a third cousin four times removed, or a fourth cousin three times removed." The villainous Count Olaf is morally depraved and generally mean, and only takes in the downtrodden yet valiant children so that he can figure out a way to separate them from their considerable inheritance. The youngsters are able to escape his clutches at the end, but since this is the first installment in A Series of Unfortunate Events, there will be more ghastly doings. Written with old-fashioned flair, this fast-paced book is not for the squeamish: the Baudelaire children are truly sympathetic characters who encounter a multitude of distressing situations. Those who enjoy a little poison in their porridge will find it wicked good fun. B&w Illustrations, Not Seen. 1999, HarperCollins, $8.95. Starred Review. © 1999 Kirkus Reviews/VNU eMedia, Inc. All rights reserved.
(PUBLISHER: HarperTrophy (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
If you are interested in stories with happy endings, you would be better off reading some other book. So cautions Snicket, the exceedingly well-mannered narrator of these two witty mock-gothic novels featuring the misadventures of 14-year-old Violet, 12-year-old Klaus and infant Sunny Baudelaire. From the first, things look unfortunate indeed for the trio: a fire destroys their home, killing their parents along with it; the executor of their parents' estate, the obtuse Mr. Poe (with a son, Edgar), ignores whatever the children have to say; and their new guardian, Count Olaf, is determined to get his hands on the Baudelaire fortune. But by using their individual gifts (Violet's for inventing, Klaus's for reading and researching and baby Sunny's for biting) the three enterprising children thwart the Count's plan--for now. The author uses formal, Latinate language and intrusive commentary to hilarious effect, even for readers unfamiliar with the literary conventions he parodies. The peril in which he places the Baudelaires may be frightening (Count Olaf actually follows through on his threats of violence on several occasions), but the author paints the satire with such broad strokes that most readers will view it from a safe distance. Luckily for fans, the woes of the Baudelaires are far from over; readers eager for more misfortune can turn to The Reptile Room, for an even more suspenseful tale. Exquisitely detailed drawings of Gothic gargoyles and mischievous eyes echo the contents of this elegantly designed hardcover. Age 9-up. (Sept.)
(PUBLISHER: HarperTrophy (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Janice M. Del Negro (The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, September 1999 (Vol. 53, No. 1))
These Aikenish takeoffs on unfortunate orphan novels promise a fast and funny series, and they very nearly deliver. In The Bad Beginning, the three Baudelaire children, Violet (age fourteen), Klaus (age twelve), and Sunny (a baby), are orphaned when the family manse burns down. They are given over to the care of Count Olaf, their wicked cousin. The count is a no-account villain, who proceeds to make their life a misery, conspiring to marry Violet in order to gain control of the family fortune. Violet foils the plot, the evil Olaf escapes, and the three children are taken in by the somewhat dense Mr. Poe, executor of their parents’ estate. The Reptile Room continues the saga of the siblings, opening with their being transported to the home of yet another distant cousin, herpetologist Dr. Montgomery, aka Uncle Monty. Uncle Monty is a jolly fellow, but unfortunately not for long--the evil Count Olaf shows up and makes short work of the orphans’ guardian. Olaf plans to kidnap them (and gain control of their fortune), and he nearly succeeds but is foiled (and escapes) once again. Snicket has a way of speaking directly to the reader (“I wish I could tell you that the Baudelaires’ first impressions of Count Olaf and his house were incorrect, as first impressions so often are. But these impressions--that Count Olaf was a horrible person and his house a depressing pigsty--were absolutely correct”) and of defining words in the context of dialogue that is, taken in large doses, irritatingly precious. The author does have the traditions of the genre down, however, and the lively misfortunes of the Baudelaires have a careening momentum that is well-served by the humorous if occasionally self-conscious text. The Baudelaire children have personality and tenacity, and their devotion to one another will hold readers when the mannered text does not. (Reviewed from galleys) Review Code: Ad -- Additional book of acceptable quality for collections needing more material in the area. (c) Copyright 1999, The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. 1999, HarperCollins, 192p, $14.89 and $8.95. Grades 4-8.
(PUBLISHER: HarperTrophy (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1999.)

Recorded Books (Recorded Books, LLC.)
Within the pages of this novel, readers will discover one of the books upon which the movie Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events is based: The Bad Beginning. Like the movie, this book tells an unhappy tale about three very unlucky children, who despite being clever and charming lead lives filled with misery and woe. From the very beginning of this volume, when the children are at the beach and receive terrible news, continuing onto the last page of this distressing story, disaster lurks at their heels. Unlike the movie, however, this book is printed on paper. Count Olaf is not only smart, he is also intelligent. A renowned, talented, and handsome actor, he certainly could have his choice of marrying any number of beautiful women, but for the time being remains single and, sadly, childless. Fans of theatrics should watch for the name "Count Olaf" on marquees and in local newspapers everywhere. P.S. He is also very good-looking. n.d., Listening Library, Unabridged CD - Library Edition; CB241, $27.75.
(PUBLISHER: Listening Library Unabridged CD- Library Edition; CB241 $27.75., PUBLISHED: n.d.)

Toni Buzzeo (Audiofile, August/September 2001)
Editor's Note: The following is a combined review with THE REPTILE ROOM.]--The three Baudelaire orphans, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny, have recently joined the world of children's literature made hospitable by a wizard named Harry. Their miserable lives, an unrelenting series of catastrophes, have become the source of grins and giggles among elementary and middle-grade readers. And who better to read the serialized melodrama than the multitalented Tim Curry, master of multiple voices and deadpan delivery? Fabulously funny, the first two volumes afford Curry, as the deeply sorrowful, omniscient narrator, an opportunity to display his enormous talents--in Mr. Poe's chronic, wheezing cough; Sunny's squawking, incomprehensible gibberish; Count Olaf's sinister and malevolent arch villainy; and Uncle Monty's lisp. An added bonus on The Bad Beginning is a wildly funny interview between Leonard Marcus and Daniel Handler (who is actually suspected to be the author, Lemony Snicket!) that will have kids longing for more. To extend the fun, each audiobook is decked out with an appropriate theme song by the Gothic Archies. Listeners should be prepared to settle in for some serious frivolity! T.B. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award. 2002 Audie Award Finalist. 2002 Grammy Nominee for Best Spoken Word Album for Children. (c) AudioFile 2001, Portland, Maine Unabridged. 2001 (orig. 1999), Listening Library, Two cassettes, 3.25 hrs., Retail pak, $18.00. Ages 8 up.
(PUBLISHER: Listening Library (New York:), PUBLISHED: p2001 c1999.)

Susie Wilde (Children's Literature)
Audio books are a fabulous family solution to travel boredom. Highly recommended are Lemony Snicket's "Series of Unfortunate Events." These satirical melodramas relate the adventures of the three gifted Baudelaire orphans as they battle the evil Count Olaf who means to destroy them and gain their fortune. This series, one of children's books' newer reading phenomena, has subtle humor, Roald Dahl-like pathos, and lots of action. The narrator of the book is so good that he qualifies as a character; he is chummy at times, entertaining at others, and periodically, amicably intrusive as he defines words and terms. These qualities translate fabulously in tapes. Tim Curry reads the first two books, The Bad Beginning and The Reptile Room. He over dramatizes, just as the series style seems to demand; he gives the villain a sinister, sibilant voice and the children's clueless protector, a phlegmy lawyer, is almost disgusting in Curry's rendition. There are two cassettes, unabridged. 2001, Listening Library, $18.00. Ages 8 up.
(PUBLISHER: Listening Library (New York:), PUBLISHED: p2001 c1999.)

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
British actor Tim Curry, whose reputation for playing dastardly villain types precedes him, is terrific in this adaptation of the intentionally over-the-top, slightly scary tale of the Baudelaire orphans. As narrator/author Snicket, Curry relates the sad saga with pity and enlightenment sparked by dashes of humor. When the Baudelaire children, Violet, Klaus and baby Sunny, learn that their parents have perished in a fire at the family mansion, the children's rocky course is set for misery and misadventure (enough to fill the projected 13 volumes of this clever book series). The executor of the Baudelaire parents' will and keeper of the family fortune, Mr. Poe, arranges for the orphans to live with a guardian, a creepy distant relative named Count Olaf. Nasty in more ways than one, Count Olaf mistreats the children, leading them to quickly discover that he only wants their money. After they unravel one of the count's more awful schemes, the children are eventually delivered from the situation, leading neatly into a sequel. Curry plays Olaf with an appropriately spooky whispering hiss and deserves extra kudos for his convincing portrayal of Poe's racking, sometimes phlegmy cough. As a bonus, the tape contains a hilarious interview between historian, critic and author Leonard S. Marcus and Daniel Handler (suspected to be the mysterious Lemony Snicket himself). An entertaining song called "Scream and Run Away," about Count Olaf, fittingly closes the proceedings. Ages 9-up. (Mar.)"
(PUBLISHER: Listening Library (New York:), PUBLISHED: p2001 c1999.)

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Publication Details:

  Publisher ISBN Notes
London: Egmont, 2010

Media Type: Language Material
1 v.:
(813.6)
1405249536
9781405249539
Originally published New York HarperCollins 1999; London Egmont Children's 2001.
New York: HarperTrophy, 2007

Media Type: Language Material
142 p.:
PZ7.S6795 ([Fic])
9780061146305
0061146307
New York N.Y.: Harper Children's Audio, 2004

Media Type: Nonmusical Sound Recording
3 sound discs (2.5 hrs.):
SDB 33335
0060765798
9780060765798
Compact discs.
New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2003

Media Type: Language Material
183 p.:
MLCS 2006/45155
0060518286
9780060518288
Issued in case.
Author's notes (p.170-183).
London: Egmont, 2003

Media Type: Language Material
176 p.:
(813.54)
1405207264
1405207256
9781405207263
9781405207256
Orininally published. New York HarperCollins 1999; London Egmont Children's 2001.
Bath: Galaxy, 2002

Media Type: Language Material
168p. (large print):
(813.54)
0754078124
9780754078128
Originally published New York HarperCollins 1999; London Egmont Children's 2001.
London: Egmont Children's, 2001

Media Type: Language Material
162 p.:
(813.54)
0749746114
9780749746117
New York: Listening Library, 2001

Media Type: Nonmusical Sound Recording
2 sound cassettes (3 hr. 17 min.):
PZ7.S6795 ([Fic])
0807261785
9780807261781
"Featuring a conversation between the author and Leonard S. Marcus"-Container.
Unabridged.
Thorndike ME: Thorndike Press, 2000

Media Type: Language Material
144 p.:
PZ7.S6795 ([Fic])
0786229748
9780786229741
New York: HarperCollins, 1999

Media Type: Language Material
162 p.:
PZ7.S6795 ([Fic])
006155023X
9780061550232
Title proper from title frame.
New York: HarperTrophy, 1999

Media Type: Language Material
162 p.
PZ7.S6795 ([Fic])
0064407667
9780064407663
New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1999

Media Type: Language Material
162 p.
PZ7.S6795 ([Fic])
0064407667
0060283122
9780064407663
9780060283124
Listening Library Unabridged CD- Library Edition; CB241 $27.75.,

Media Type:

9780807219904
0807219908

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