Brian's winter

Author Paulsen, Gary.
Language English
Publisher
New York: Ember, 2012




Annotation:

Instead of being rescued from a plane crash, as in the author's book "Hatchet," this story portrays what would have happened to Brian had he been forced to survive a winter in the wilderness with only his survival pack and hatchet



Subjects :

  • Juvenile fiction
  • Survival
  • Fiction
  • Wilderness survival
  • Self-reliance
  • Winter

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Author Illustrator(s) :

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Best Books :

  • American Booksellers Pick of the Lists, Spring, 1996 American Booksellers Association
  • Best Children's Books of the Year, 1996 Bank Street College of Education
  • Kirkus Book Review Stars, 1996
  • Middle And Junior High School Library Catalog, Eighth Edition, 2000 H.W. Wilson
  • Notable Children's Books in the Language Arts, 1997 NCTE Children's Literature Assembly
  • Recommended Literature: Kindergarten through Grade Twelve, 2002 California Department of Education
  • YALSA Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers, 1997 American Library Association
  • Young Adults' Choices, 1998 International Reading Association
  • Notable Children's Books in the English Language Arts, 1997 NCTE Children's Literature Assembly

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Awards, Honors & Prizes :

  • Garden State Teen Book Award, 1999 Winner New Jersey
  • Golden Archer Award, 1999 Winner Wisconsin
  • Iowa Teen Award, 1998 Winner Iowa
  • Massachusetts Children's Book Award, 1999 Honor Book Massachusetts
  • Soaring Eagle Book Award, 1998 2nd Runner-up Wyoming
  • Volunteer State Book Award, 2000 Winner Tennessee

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State & Provincial Reading List :

  • Charlie May Simon ChildrenÂ’s Book Award, 1998-1999; Nominee Arkansas
  • Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award, 1997-98; Nominee Colorado
  • Golden Sower Award, 1998; Nominee Nebraska
  • Indian Paintbrush Book Award, 1998; Nominee Wyoming
  • Iowa Children's Choice Award, 1997-1998; Nominee Iowa
  • Mark Twain Award, 1998-1999; Nominee Missouri
  • Massachusetts Children's Book Award, 1998-1999; Nominee Massachusetts
  • Sasquatch Reading Award, 1999; Nominee Washington
  • South Carolina Junior Book Award, 1999; Nominee South Carolina
  • Wisconsin Battle of the Books, 2010-2011; Wisconsin
  • Young Adult Reading Program, 1997; South Dakota

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Curriculum Tools :

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Reading Measurement Programs:


0385321988, 9780385321983, 0553472895
Bantam; Distributed by Audio Bookshelf (New York:) 1996.

Accelerated Reader
Interest Level Middle Grade
Book Level 5.9
Accelerated Reader Points 5

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 7
Accelerated Reader Points 9


9780440227199, 0440227194
Dell/Laurel-Leaf 134p. 18cm $4.99. () 1996.

Accelerated Reader
Interest Level Middle Grade
Book Level 5.9
Accelerated Reader Points 5

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Interest Level 6-8
Reading Level 7
Accelerated Reader Points 9

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Reviews :

Robin F. Whitten (Audiofile, June 1996)
Gary Paulsen adds to the saga of Brian, the boy who survived the plane crash in the North Woods, as told previously in HATCHET and THE RIVER. Richard Thomas delivers a somewhat melodramatic reading of this mild-mannered survival story. His tone fails to convey Brian's isolation or apprehension and builds none of the tension present in Peter Coyote's readings of the earlier titles. The title provides an additional entry in Paulsen's popular audio repertoire, but it's not the strongest. R.F.W. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine Unabridged. 1996, Random House Audio, Two cassettes, 3 hrs., Retail pak, $16.99.
(PUBLISHER: Bantam; Distributed by Audio Bookshelf (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1996.)

Hazel Rochman (Booklist, December 15, 1995 (Vol. 92, No. 8))
Writing with simplicity, Paulsen is at his best in an elemental story of wilderness survival. In this sequel to his widely popular Hatchet (1987), he spells out an alternative ending many readers have tried to imagine: What if 13-year-old Brian hadn't been rescued before winter came? What if he had had to face the cold months alone in the Canadian north? This time Brian has a survival kit he found in the crashed plane (including two butane lighters, a rifle, a fishing line, and a sleeping bag), but otherwise he has to find food, shelter, and clothing from the world around him. He sees himself like the first Americans, learning to make arrowheads and snowshoes, getting to know the sounds and tracks and weather of his place in the wild. Of course, Brian is extraordinarily resourceful and inventive. What's more, he somehow recovers from everything without injury, even after being knocked unconscious by a 700-pound moose. There's no suspense; we know he'll make it. Yet, as in the autobiographical Woodsong (1990), Paulsen writes with the authoritative particularity of someone who knows the woods. This docunovel is for outdoors lovers and also for all of those adventurers snug at home in a centrally heated high-rise. The facts are the drama. Category: Older Readers. 1996, Delacorte, $15.95. Gr. 5-9.
(PUBLISHER: Bantam; Distributed by Audio Bookshelf (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1996.)

Susie Wilde (Children's Literature)
Gary Paulsen's Hatchet is one of the most successful books for young adult readers, reluctant or otherwise. It's a gripping story of survival that leaves a young boy to fend for himself in the northern Wilderness. In response to two hundred letters a week from children begging for sequel, he wrote Brian's Winter. The sequel begins with the assumption that the boy was not rescued at the end of the summer, as he was in Hatchet, and now must struggle to survive the approaching winter. There is a whole different set of concerns; Brian's shelter must be winterized, his clothing made warmer, and his hunting kills larger to sustain bitter weather. Changing the end of one book to allow for a sequel is tricky, but Paulsen's book succeeds. Brian, while consistent in character, evolves in survival skills. Paulsen adds new conflicts, but his writing is still gripping. All these justify the new ending, but the best justification is that this book will please his fans. 1996, Delacorte, $15.95. Ages 10 up.
(PUBLISHER: Bantam; Distributed by Audio Bookshelf (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1996.)

CCBC (Cooperative Children's Book Center Choices, 1996)
Brian's Winter picks up where Paulsen's Hatchet (Bradbury, 1987) left off--almost--exploring what life for 13-year-old Brian Robeson would have been like had he not been rescued at the end of the earlier novel. Now faced with enduring a winter in the Alaskan wilderness where he has been stranded after a plane crash, Brian's story of survival takes on added urgency as tries to predict and prepare for his needs as the temperature grows increasingly cold. He has no warm clothes, no stored food, no decent shelter. But as the snows begin to fall, Brian is determined to meet the challenge, using all that he knows and can learn from the natural world that both threatens and offers him salvation. CCBC categories: Fiction for Teenagers. 1996, Delacorte, 133 pages, $15.95. Ages 10-13.
(PUBLISHER: Bantam; Distributed by Audio Bookshelf (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1996.)

Kirkus (Kirkus Reviews, 1996)
Suppose Brian Robeson hadn't been rescued from the wilderness before hard winter set in? On this premise Paulsen (The Rifle, p. 1286) crafts a companion/sequel to Hatchet (1987) containing many of its same pleasures: seeing Brian face challenge after life-threatening challenge, of both the immediate and the insidious kind, aided only by ingenuity, spirit, sharp eyes, and a tiny cache of salvaged gear; discovering with him the tools and skills needed for survival; savoring Paulsen's economical, evocative descriptions of woodland sights, sounds, and smells. Brian learns how to hunt large game with bows and arrows and to fashion crude but effective winter clothing and shelter just in time for winter rains and snows. Having already fought his battles with fear, despair, and loneliness in the previous book, Brian seems almost comfortable, his thoughts of home more a way of passing time than a source of any sharp emotion, and when a family of Cree trappers finds him at the end, he leaves with mixed feelings, clearly seduced by the wild. Aside from a brief foreword, Paulsen picks Hatchet's story up in midstream; read together, the two books make his finest tale of survival yet. 1996, Delacorte, $15.95. Starred Review. © 1996 Kirkus Reviews/VNU eMedia, Inc. All rights reserved.
(PUBLISHER: Bantam; Distributed by Audio Bookshelf (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1996.)

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
First there was Hatchet, Paulsen's classic tale of a boy's survival in the north woods after a plane crash. Then came a sequel, The River, and, last year, Father Water, Mother Woods, a collection of autobiographical essays introduced as the nonfiction counterpart to Hatchet. Now Paulsen backs up and asks readers to imagine that Brian, the hero, hadn't been rescued after all. His many fans will be only too glad to comply, revisiting Brian at the onset of a punishing Canadian winter. The pace never relents-the story begins, as it were, in the middle, with Brian already toughened up and his reflexes primed for crisis. Paulsen serves up one cliffhanger after another (a marauding bear, a charging elk), and always there are the supreme challenges of obtaining food and protection against the cold. Authoritative narration makes it easy for readers to join Brian vicariously as he wields his hatchet to whittle arrows and arrowheads and a lance, hunts game, and devises clothes out of animal skins; while teasers at the ends of chapters keep the tension high (``He would hunt big tomorrow, he thought.... But as it happened he very nearly never hunted again''). The moral of the story: it pays to write your favorite author and ask for another helping. Ages 12-up. (Feb.)
(PUBLISHER: Bantam; Distributed by Audio Bookshelf (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1996.)

Gary M. Salvner (The ALAN Review, Fall 1996 (Vol. 24, No. 1))
This "alternative sequel" explores what might have happened had thirteen-year-old Brian Robeson not been rescued at the end of Paulsen's noted Hatchet and instead had to survive a frigid winter alone in the northern Canadian wilderness. In this book the cold is the primary enemy, and Brian again learns that survival depends upon first observing closely his environment and then living according to its laws. A veteran winter survivalist, Paulsen fills Brian's Winter with the same vivid details that made the earlier Hatchet and The River so believable. And here he adds an extra dimension: like Russell Suskit in Paulsen's Dogsong, Brian survives this time by returning to the "old ways" -- fashioning flint arrowheads to hunt large game and even painting on cave walls to record important events. Finally, Paulsen has brought his lively humor to this work. His character Betty the skunk is certainly literature's most entertaining animal thief since E. B. White's Templeton! Lovers of Gary Paulsen's survival stories will love this work also. This is terrific outdoor adventure writing. 1996, Delacorte, 133 pp., $15.95. Ages 12 up.
(PUBLISHER: Bantam; Distributed by Audio Bookshelf (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1996.)

Roger Sutton (The Bulletin of the Center for ChildrenÂ’s Books, February 1996 (Vol. 49, No. 6))
In his epilogue to Hatchet, Paulsen wrote that "had Brian not been rescued when he was, had he been forced to go into hard fall, perhaps winter, it would have been very rough on him." That's the tack in this what-if sequel, where Brian does manage to retrieve the survival pack from the downed plane but does not find the emergency transmitter, and so must endure the north-woods winter with little more than his newly acquired survival skills and, of course, his hatchet. Unlike Hatchet, where Brian's concern over his parents' divorce pervaded the story, the conflict here is entirely physical, boy against the elements: "The problem-well, he thought smiling, one of about a thousand problems-was that he didn't honestly know how cold it would get or how much snow there would be or what he could do to live." That he does survive until rescue is an expectation of the genre; that he manages credibly is a tribute to Paulsen's outdoor savvy and focused writing. While hardened and sharpened by his previous months in the wilderness, Brian is still an ordinary kid, and his accomplishments (making a bow and arrows, clothing, shelter, snowshoes) are admirable precisely because we know how difficult they are to do, composed as they are of equal shares of ingenuity, hard work, and trial-and-error. Brian is a popular hero because he makes kids think that they could do it, too, and Paulsen provides enough step-by-step instruction so that, maybe, they could. (And for readers who can't get enough, don't forget Paulsen's previous sequel to Hatchet, The River, reviewed in the 6/91 issue.) R--Recommended. Reviewed from galleys (c) Copyright 1996, The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. 1996, Delacorte, [192p], $15.95. Grades 5-9.
(PUBLISHER: Bantam; Distributed by Audio Bookshelf (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1996.)

Helen Turner (VOYA, February 1997 (Vol. 19, No. 6))
Brian Robeson is stranded in the Canadian wilderness following the crash of a small plane which kills the pilot, the only other person aboard. After about two months, he is rescued. The riveting account of the teenager's struggle to survive was vivdly portrayed in Paulsen's Hatchet (Bradbury, 1987). Here is an alternative ending, in which Brian is not rescued at the end of the summer but instead is forced to spend the fall and part of a bitter winter in the woods. Adapting the skill he has already learned, Brian is able to fortify his cave shelter, find ways to kill larger game and protect himself against new dangers. As he ranges farther from his camp, he encounters a toboggan track that leads him to the home of a Cree family of trappers. Brian stays with the Cree family until their supply plane makes its scheduled stop, and he leaves the wilderness on the plane. This is more than a relating of Brian's adventures with bears, moose, blizzards and skunks. It is about animals and weather and survival, of course, but there is a beauty and a compelling depth to the writing. As Brian sometimes fails and sometimes succeeds, his characterization is consistent and believable. The descriptions of the wilderness and Brian's thoughts and interactions with all of his surroundings are woven into the narrative. There are a few references to incidents in Hatchet, but this story will stand alone. Pick either ending--a summer rescue or a winter rescue--and you have a great adventure story. VOYA CODES: 5Q 5P M J S (Hard to imagine it being any better written; Every YA (who reads) was dying to read it yesterday; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 1996, Delacorte, 133p., $15.95. Ages 11 to 18.
(PUBLISHER: Bantam; Distributed by Audio Bookshelf (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1996.)

Robin F. Whitten (Audiofile, June 1996)
Gary Paulsen adds to the saga of Brian, the boy who survived the plane crash in the North Woods, as told previously in HATCHET and THE RIVER. Richard Thomas delivers a somewhat melodramatic reading of this mild-mannered survival story. His tone fails to convey Brian's isolation or apprehension and builds none of the tension present in Peter Coyote's readings of the earlier titles. The title provides an additional entry in Paulsen's popular audio repertoire, but it's not the strongest. R.F.W. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine Unabridged. 1996, Random House Audio, Two cassettes, 3 hrs., Retail pak, $16.99.
(PUBLISHER: Bantam Doubleday Dell Audio (New York:), PUBLISHED: 1996.)

Robin F. Whitten (Audiofile, June 1996)
Gary Paulsen adds to the saga of Brian, the boy who survived the plane crash in the North Woods, as told previously in HATCHET and THE RIVER. Richard Thomas delivers a somewhat melodramatic reading of this mild-mannered survival story. His tone fails to convey Brian's isolation or apprehension and builds none of the tension present in Peter Coyote's readings of the earlier titles. The title provides an additional entry in Paulsen's popular audio repertoire, but it's not the strongest. R.F.W. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine Unabridged. 1996, Random House Audio, Two cassettes, 3 hrs., Retail pak, $16.99.
(PUBLISHER: BDD Audio (New York:), PUBLISHED: p1996.)

Paula Rohrlick (KLIATT Review, March 1998 (Vol. 32, No. 2))
In Paulsen's Newbery Honor book, Hatchet, 13-year-old Brian survives alone in the Canadian wilderness for almost two months after a plane crash. But what if he hadn't been rescued? That's the premise of this gripping sequel, in which Brian must endure the hardships of winter alone in the cold woods. His hard-won survival skills are tested by the elements as well as by encounters with a bear and a moose. Brian must figure out how to weatherproof his shelter, get enough fuel for his fire, and find ways to clothe himself warmly, hunt in the snow, and defend himself against danger. Paulsen describes in precise detail how Brian crafts snowshoes, makes a strong bow and arrowheads of flint, sews fur clothing and hunts game. Fans of Paulsen's tales of wilderness survival will welcome the authentic information, and Brian remains a sympathetic and believable character as he learns from his mistakes and comes to live in harmony with his harsh but beautiful environment. KLIATT Codes: JS*--Exceptional book, recommended for junior and senior high school students. 1996, Dell/Laurel-Leaf, 134p. 18cm, $4.99. Ages 13 to 18.
(PUBLISHER: Dell/Laurel-Leaf 134p. 18cm $4.99., PUBLISHED: 1996)

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Publication Details:

  Publisher ISBN Notes
New York: Ember, 2012

Media Type: Language Material
133 p. ;
PZ7.P2843 ([Fic])
9780307929587
0307929582
Originally published New York: Delacorte Press 1996.
Newport Beach CA: Books on Tape ;, 2000

Media Type: Nonmusical Sound Recording
2 sound cassettes (1.5 hrs. ea.):
0736690530
9780736690539
Date from container. Date on cassette 1996.
Unabridged.
Hamburg: Carlsen, 1997

Media Type: Language Material
144 p. ;
(j813/.54)
3551551634
9783551551634
Story set in Canada.
Companion book to Allein in der Wildnis (Hatchet) and Der Fluss (The river).
Translation of Brian's winter.
Dell/Laurel-Leaf 134p. 18cm $4.99., 1996

Media Type:

0440227194
9780440227199
New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Audio, 1996

Media Type: Nonmusical Sound Recording
2 sound cassettes (180 min.):
(Pau)
0553472895
9780553472899
Unabridged.
New York: BDD Audio, 1996

Media Type: Nonmusical Sound Recording
2 sound cassettes (180 min.):
PZ7.P2843 (SR F)
0553472895
9780553472899
9780533448739
9780533448746
0533448735
0533448743
BDD Audio BDDAP 618 (BDDAP 618A-BDDAP 618B).
Companion book to Hatchet and The river.
Unabridged.
New York: Bantam; Distributed by Audio Bookshelf, 1996

Media Type: Nonmusical Sound Recording
2 sound cassettes (3 hrs.):
PZ7.P2843 ([Fic])
0553472895
0385321988
9780385321983
9780553472899
Companion book to Hatchet and The river.

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