Listening for Madeleine: a portrait of Madeleine L'Engle in many voices /

Author
Language English
Publisher
New York: Farrar Straus and Giroux, 2012




Annotation:

"A book of interviews with people who knew Madeleine L'Engle, author of the children's classic A WRINKLE IN TIME, in the many facets of her life"--



Subjects :

  • BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Literary.
  • Women authors, American
  • Authors, American
  • Biography
  • BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Women.

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Reviews :

Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)
In this insightful biography of beloved children's book author Madeline L'Engle (A Wrinkle in Time, winner of the Newberry Medal), Marcus (Minders of Make-Believe) draws upon dozens of interviews with those who knew L'Engle personally and professionally, as well as with representatives of "the thousands of students, teachers, librarians, aspiring writers, neighbors and others who crossed her path." The result is both impressionistic and satisfyingly complex. One topic of concern is the spiritual aspect of L'Engle's work, which often got her books banned. We also get a window into her working habits, which included banging away on her grand piano. One of her editors at FSG recalls that "if you didn't pick your words right, you might end up with a whole new revision on your desk twenty-two minutes later." Throughout, L'Engle appears both remarkably generous and intensely private. For those who read L'Engle during childhood, this book will serve as a valuable companion to the stories they cherish. Photos. Agent: George Nicholson, Sterling Lord Literistic. (Nov.)\n
(PUBLISHER: Farrar Straus and Giroux (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2012.)

Kate Quealy-Gainer (The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, November 2012 (Vol. 66, No. 3))
Marcus, noted children’s-literature scholar and sometime GSLIS adjunct lecturer, offers up yet another provocative and multifaceted portrait of a well-known children’s author, this time training his keen eye on A Wrinkle in Time author Madeleine L’Engle. A writer whose dramatic personality has sparked nearly as much discussion as her religious mediations and works of science fiction, L’Engle is here remembered as friend, matriarch, mentor, and icon, in a series of interviews with L’Engle’s most intimate acquaintances as well as editors, librarians, and teachers who have been impacted by her work. Former Bulletin editor Betsy Hearne discusses her 1998 interview with L’Engle during which they talked about the balance between family and professional obligations; Christine Jenkins, former CCB director, shares a story about her mostly unpleasant run-in with the writer at an ALA conference. Marcus’s selected interviewees range from the devoted fan to the less than enthusiastic critic and the resulting portrait is unexpectedly complex, a far cry from the usual soft-focus posthumous homage, and it will likely offer new insights to both scholars and readers who have enjoyed (or disliked, for that matter) her work. Review Code: Ad -- Additional book of acceptable quality for collections needing more material in the area. (c) Copyright 2006, The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. 2012, Farrar, 336p.; Reviewed from galleys, $27.00. Grades 7-12.
(PUBLISHER: Farrar Straus and Giroux (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2012.)

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Publication Details:

  Publisher ISBN Notes
New York: Farrar Straus and Giroux, 2012

Media Type: Language Material
363 p.:
PS3523.E55 (813/.54)
9780374298975
9780374534202
0374298971
0374534209

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