Unwind

Author Shusterman, Neal
Language English
Publisher
Grand Haven MI: Brilliance Audio, 2009




Annotation:

In a future world where those between the ages of thirteen and eighteen can have their lives "unwound" and their body parts harvested for use by others, three teens go to extreme lengths to uphold their beliefs--and, perhaps, save their own lives.



Subjects :

  • Young Adult Fiction
  • Fugitives From Justice Fiction
  • Science Fiction
  • Survival Skills Juvenile Fiction
  • Survival Fiction
  • Survival Skills Fiction
  • Runaway Children Juvenile Fiction
  • Revolutionaries Fiction

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Best Books :

  • 100 Best Books for BC Students, 2016 , Secondary
  • Futurescapes: Selected Speculative and Science Fiction for Children and Teens, 2011 , Too Close for Comfort?
  • School Library Journal Book Review Stars, 2010 , None
  • YALSA Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults, 2011 , What If

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Awards, Honors & Prizes :

  • Black-Eyed Susan Book Award , High School , 2009
  • Eliot Rosewater Indiana High School Book Award , None , 2010
  • Evergreen Teen Book Award , None , 2010
  • Gateway Readers Award , None , 2009
  • Great Lakes Great Books Award , Grades 9-12 , 2009
  • Green Mountain Book Award , None , 2010
  • Nevada Young Readers' Award , Intermediate , 2010
  • Wirral Paperback of the Year Award , None , 2010

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State & Provincial Reading List :

  • Abraham Lincoln Illinois High School Book Award; None 2011-2011
  • California Young Reader Medal; Young Adult 2010-2011
  • Eliot Rosewater Indiana High School Book Award; None 2009-2010
  • Evergreen Teen Book Award; None 2010-2010
  • Flume: NH Teen Reader's Choice Award; None 2011-2011
  • Gateway Readers Award; None 2009-2010
  • Georgia Peach Teen Readers' Choice Award; None 2009-2010
  • Great Lakes Great Books Award; Grades 9-12 2009-2010
  • Iowa Teen Award; None 2011-2012
  • Isinglass Teen Read Award; None 2010-2011
  • Nevada Young Readers' Award; Intermediate 2010-2010
  • Nutmeg Book Award; Teen 2011-2011
  • Pennsylvania Young Readers' Choice Award; Young Adult 2009-2010
  • Read On Wisconsin; Middle School 2013-2014
  • Reading Olympics Booklist; High School 2010-2010
  • Rhode Island Teen Book Award; All Teens 2010-2010
  • Soaring Eagle Book Award; Grades 7-12 2011-2012
  • Virginia Readers' Choice Award; High School 2009-2010
  • Young Adult Reading Program; High School 2009

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Curriculum Tools :

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Reading Measurement Programs:


999999
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Lexile, MetaMetrics, Inc.
HL740L(High-Low)

Reading Counts-Scholastic
Reading Level 4.5
Interest Level 6-8
Title Point Value 23

Accelerated Reader

Interest Level UG
Accelerated Reader Points 14

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Reviews :

John Peters (Booklist)
Following in the footsteps of Jonathan Swift, Shusterman uncorks a Modest Proposal of his own to solve a Pro-Life/Pro-Choice dilemma. Set in a future in which abortions are outlawed but parents have the option of signing over their 13- to 17-year-olds to be used as organ donors, the tale focuses on 16-year-old Connor, who falls in with other prospective Unwinds and finds a temporary refuge (thanks to a clandestine organization with its own peculiar agenda) before being captured and sent to Happy Jack Harvest Camp. Though laced with intrigue, betrayals, and narrow squeaks, the story is propelled less by the plot (which is largely a series of long set pieces) than by an ingeniously developed cast and premise. But even readers who gravitate more to plot-driven fiction will find this present-tense page-turner thrilling, though it s guaranteed to leave some feeling decidedly queasy despite the (improbable) happy ending. Grades 6-9
(PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2007.)

Melanie Hundley (ALAN)
Unwind takes place after the Second Civil War, a long and violent war between the Pro-life and Pro-choice armies. According to the Bill of Life, a set of laws passed to end the war, life is sacred from the point of conception until the age of 13. Between 13 and 18, a child may be retroactively aborted as long as the child s life doesn t technically end. The process by which a child is both terminated and yet still alive is called unwinding. Connor s parents choose to unwind him because he gets in trouble at school. Risa, an orphan, is unwound by the state because there isn t enough money to take care of her. Lev s family is religious, and his unwinding has been planned since his birth. He is raised to see himself as a tithe. These three teens meet by accident and struggle to survive until they are 18. Category: Science Fiction/Dystopia. YA--Young Adult. 2007, Simon & Shuster Books for Young Readers, 352 pp., $16.99. Ages young adult.
(PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2007.)

Courtney Wika (VOYA)
Shusterman's latest novel takes place after the Heartland War. Waged between the Pro-Choice and Pro-Life "armies," the conflict was settled with the drafting of The Bill of Life, which states that life is protected until the age of Reason, but between the ages of thirteen to eighteen a child can be "unwound" at the request of the parents. Unwinding is an honorable action according to adults, but it is a terrible fate for the Unwind in that the organs, limbs, and brain tissue are disseminated to other humans who require transplants or appearance "upgrades." The novel follows three protagonists who are attempting to "kick-AWOL" and survive to eighteen to escape their unwindings: Connor, the rebellious teen; Risa, a ward of the state being unwound because of budget cuts; and Lev, a tithe born as an unwind sacrifice. The novel begs two questions: When does a life have value? Who determines whether it is worth keeping? Unfortunately who is unwound and who gets which "parts" is often determined by socio-economic status. In addition, parents seem to shamelessly unwind their children for typical teen frustration and rebellion. Betrayal by parents and the system is a horrifying truth for the protagonists. As such, there are many passages that are difficult to read either for their heartrending nature or their shocking specifics, particularly the detailed "harvest" of a well-known character. Poignant, compelling, and ultimately terrifying, this book will enjoy popularity with a wide range of readers beyond its science-fiction base. VOYA CODES: 4Q 4P J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Broad general YA appeal; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2007, Simon & Schuster, 352p., $16.99. Ages 12 to 18.
(PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2007.)

April Spisak (Bulletin)
In this dystopic thriller, children between thirteen and eighteen can be unwound by their parents if they are deemed unsuitable in any way. Unwinding is considered the ethical middle ground coming out of a war between the pro-choice and pro-life armies: parents can retroactively abort a child as long as all of the parts are used for medical purposes, thus ensuring the child doesn t officially die. The story focuses on three young people: Lev, a thirteen-year-old, who has always known his purpose was to be unwound as a gift to God; and Connor, a troubled teen, and Risa, a not-gifted-enough musician, who are both shocked to learn of their fate. Although the three initially have little in common when they meet en route to an unwinding camp, they soon form a tight bond as they travel the underground escape route to finally land at a seeming haven, an airplane junkyard headed by a well-meaning admiral haunted by memories of his own unwound son. The shocking premise is unveiled immediately, and a nail-biting pace is sustained throughout, with the teens flung headlong into a true life-or-death struggle. In the quiet moments of safety, philosophical explorations of what it means to be alive, what the rights of children are, and whether or not one s soul resides in the whole body or in individual pieces unfold, and these haunting debates will likely linger in the reader s mind even after the riveting plot fades. Fans of Farmer s The House of the Scorpion (BCCB 11/02) will find intriguing overlaps on the ethics of harvesting humans, and science fiction buffs in general will find this an ideal blend of philosophy and action set in a compelling futuristic landscape Review Code: R -- Recommended. (c) Copyright 2006, The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. 2007, Simon, 335p., $16.99. Grades 8-10.
(PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2007.)

Paula Rohrlick (Kliatt)
In a near-future society, a compromise has been reached to end a war between pro-life and pro-choice factions: abortion has been outlawed, but between the ages of 13 and 18 a parent can choose to unwind a child--to have all the child s organs donated so that the child technically lives on, even if it s as parts of other people s bodies. Connor, whose quick temper gets him into trouble all the time, learns he is to be one of these Unwinds, and so does Risa, an unwanted ward of the state. Neither is willing to accept this fate, and they escape, encountering Lev, who is a tithe--a 10th child born to be unwound. They go on the run and find their way to the Graveyard, where surplus planes are warehoused and where a mysterious Admiral tries to save Unwinds from the harvest camps. However, when an evil bully informs on Connor and Risa, a harvest camp is where they all end up, waiting to be dismantled. Will Lev s beliefs manage to save them or kill them? This exciting thriller from the popular author of Scorpion Shards and many other YA novels will appeal to SF fans. There s lots of action, along with some provocative ideas about the meaning of life, and the three protagonists are all appealing heroes in their own ways. Category: Hardcover Fiction. KLIATT Codes: JS--Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2007, Simon & Schuster, 352p., $16.99. Ages 12 to 18.
(PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2007.)

Amanda Powell (Kutztown)
This book is about a future society that uses teenagers to donate body parts even though it is not willfully. The story unfolds the trials of a few children called Unwinds and their journey to escape the tragic end to their lives as a whole person. This book would be a great modern book to have students read with classics like 1984 and Brave New World. There are real articles throughout the book that lead the reader to think that it is possible for a society like this one to exist. It is a wonderful tale of heroics from a perspective that teenagers can understand. Category: Science Fiction. 2007, Shuster Books, $16.99. Ages 13 to 18.
(PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2007.)

Enid Stephenson (Carousel)
This is not a world you would want to inhabit. Connor s parents want to be rid of him because he is a troublemaker. Risa is being unwound to save orphanage costs. Lev s unwinding is a sacrifice. Unwinding -- a euphemism for the living dead where organ transplants rule. If they can survive to their eighteenth birthday they will not be unwound... This book challenges ones ideas about life, about morality, about religion, about fanatics. It is not a comfortable read but it is thought-provoking. Category: Reads 4 Teens. Simon and Schuster, 6.99.
(PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Children's (London:), PUBLISHED: 2008.)

Midwest Book Review (CBW)
Neal Shusterman's UNWIND tells of a grim future society where unwanted teens are salvaged for their body parts. Conner is an unwanted troublemaker, Risa has no parents, and Lev's unwinding has been planned since his birth. The three join forces to survive and find themselves on a dangerous cross-country journey struggling to survive through their eighteenth birthday, when they won't have to worry about being unwound'. A thought-provoking story of survival makes for vivid reading for mature young adults. The Fiction Shelf ...., Simon & Schuster, $16.99. Ages 15+
(PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2007.)

Kirkus (Kirkus)
Shusterman's Everlost (2006) dealt with death and children with a sense of innocence, redemption and even humor. None of that is present here. In a time not far distant, life is deemed to be sacrosanct from the instant of conception until the age of 13. From 13 to 18, however, parents and guardians have the opportunity to have children "unwound." Technically, life doesn't end, but every part of the child is "harvested" to be parceled out and passed on to the highest bidder. In this gruesome age of organ harvest, readers meet Connor (doomed to be unwound by his parents), Risa (doomed as a ward of the state due to overcrowding) and Lev, a tithe, conceived for the express purpose of being unwound and "donated" to society. Their story of escape and struggle to survive in a society that lauds itself on the protection of life, but which has reduced human body parts to market commodities, unrolls against a bleak background of indifference, avarice, guilt, regret, loss, pain and rebellion. Well-written, this draws the reader into a world that is both familiar and strangely foreign, and generates feelings of horror, disturbance, disgust and fear. As with classics such as 1984 and Fahrenheit 451, one can only hope that this vision of the future never becomes reality. 2007, Simon & Schuster, 352p, $16.99. Category: Science fiction. Ages 13 up. © 2007 Kirkus Reviews/VNU eMedia, Inc. All rights reserved.
(PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2007.)

CCBC (CCBC)
An extraordinarily thought-provoking novel is based on a deeply disturbing premise: to end the bloody Heartland War, also know as the Second Civil War and fought over the issue of abortion, a set of constitutional amendments known as The Bill of Life was passed. They protect human life from the time of conception until a child turns thirteen. Between the ages of thirteen and eighteen, however, children may be retroactively aborted if parents choose unwinding, a process that draws on modern science to harvest every part of the body for transplant into another human being. In this horrifying future, three teens two determined to escape their fate, and one who has been raised to welcome it as a way to honor God find themselves thrown together and on the run. Neal Shusterman paints a portrait of a controlled and controlling society where teens are viewed with suspicion, babies are abandoned on doorsteps (by law those that fine them must raise them as their own), and most adults have accepted the unacceptable. There are voices of protest but there is also a government that is amazingly proficient in its ability to deconstruct human life. Shusterman s chilling narrative draws deft parallels between his imagined time and our society today, extending the polemics of the abortion debate to a disquieting extreme that compromises both the sanctity of life and the right to control one s own body; illuminating suburban insulation; and highlighting society s willingness to turn its back on many teens. CCBC Category: Fiction for Young Adults. 2007, Simon & Schuster, 335 pages, $16.99. Age 13 and older.
(PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2007.)

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Publication Details:

  Publisher ISBN Notes
Grand Haven MI: Brilliance Audio, 2009

Media Type: Nonmusical Sound Recording
1 sound disc (10 hr. 11 min.):
PZ7.S55987 ([Fic])
1423373103
9781423373100
142337309X
9781423373094
1423373081
9781423373087
1423373073
9781423373070
1441827366
9781441827364
1416912053
9781416912057
9781416994961
1416994963
1847382312
9781847382313
Compact disc MP3 format.
Unabridged.
Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (New York:), PUBLISHED: c2007.,

Media Type:

9781416912040
9781847382313
9781441827364
1423373081
9781423373087
9781416912057
1423373103
0329746499
9780329746490
1423373073
1416912045
9781416994961
9781423373070
9781423373100
142337309X
1847382312
1441827366
9786077949848
6077949841
1416994963
1416912053
9781423373094

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