Ugly ways: a novel /

Author Ansa, Tina McElroy
Language English
Publisher
San Diego: Harcourt Brace Co., 1995







Subjects :

  • Sisters Fiction
  • Georgia Fiction
  • African American Women Fiction
  • Domestic Fiction

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Reviews :

Elizabeth L. Becker (Kliatt)
This novel about the dynamics of relationships among members of a black family in a small southern town brings three sisters together for their mother's funeral. She was a powerful presence while she lived and her daughters are still emotionally in her thrall. They talk about the way she was after "she changed," when she suddenly ceased to be motherly and sympathetic and an obedient wife. She became selfish, capricious, bohemian, and demanding. She lay in bed all day and gardened all night. Now, in death, she is lying in her coffin at the funeral parlor, watching her daughters, criticizing them, thinking about her life. Her daughters have all "made it" in the world. The oldest has a successful, high-priced beauty parlor, an elegant house, and a teenage lover. Annie Ruth, stylishly messy and promiscuous, has a successful TV program in L.A. Emily is an archivist for the state of Georgia, lives in Atlanta, sees a psychiatrist regularly, and comes home every weekend. Poppa remembers a time when the girls were small and "his voice was the only one that mattered in the house." That was before "the four women in the house overwhelmed him." And mother asks each one, "Are you my child or are you his, make up your mind!" She says in her monologue from the coffin that the girls don't remember the good times they had with her. "God, those girls got ugly ways!" The girls meanwhile brood and argue about her--whether she loved them, what she did to them, how she messed up their lives. Annie Ruth says that if Mudear ever said she loved them she probably said, "I love you, daughter, but I hate your ways. You got ugly ways sometimes." Along with the mother/daughter theme, the novel explores the sisters' feelings about each other, and the way black women are treated by black men. In all, the picture is clear and credible. The patterns described are found in lots of families, without regard to color. Category: Fiction. KLIATT Codes: SA--Recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 1993, Harcourt Brace/Harvest, 277p. 21cm. 94-33938., $9.95. Ages 15 to adult.
(PUBLISHER: Harcourt Brace Co. (San Diego:), PUBLISHED: 1995.)

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Series :

Harvest American writing-A Harvest book-

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Publication Details:

  Publisher ISBN Notes
San Diego: Harcourt Brace Co., 1995

Media Type: Language Material
277 p. ;
PS3551.N64 (813/.54)
0156000776
9780156000772
Harcourt Brace Co. (San Diego:), PUBLISHED: 1995.,

Media Type:

0156000776
9780156000772

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